Does money cause us to become out of touch with reality?

Lebron

This week during a press conference after the Cleveland Cavaliers defeated the Denver Nuggets, Lebron James briefly touched on the Tamir Rice shooting.  There was once a time when athletes such as Muhammad Ali, Bill Russell, and Jim Brown all played a pivotal role in the civil rights fight. So quite naturally as racial tension grows in the country, and a 12 year-old Black child was killed in Cleveland (the home of Lebron James), people were expecting to hear something other than what they actually heard.

In the statement Lebron said, “I caught a little bit of it from my folks on the side saying that you guys might ask me about it, but I have no knowledge,” James said. “I’m not much of a social media guy. I’m on it, for sure, but I’m not always looking at what’s going on in it.”

I did not know if I should burry my head in the sand, or to start crying. How is this happening in your own back yard, and you don’t know that it’s is going on? Come on Lebron!  You have two sons who could one day be pulled over by the police. We all know that you have a big beautiful home, a lot of money, a recognizable face, and privilege beyond the normal Black man, but what does it all mean?  This is what bothers me about when Black folk feel that they have arrived.  All of a sudden we begin to believe that it is not my problem.  I have worked with many privileged Blacks, and for some odd reason, these are the people who begin to say, “I don’t see racism, and you should really stop speaking on it!”  These are the gatekeepers. These are the people who receive limitless promotions, because as long as they get paid, all the other issues don’t matter to them.

We need to rid ourselves of gate keeping athletes, politicians, and leaders. These people play a major role in keeping things at status quo. We need people who are not afraid to stand up for what’s right. Being the “Jackie Robinson” of your office or company is no longer acceptable.  You are not the smartest Black person on the face of the earth. You are not the most qualified either.  Maybe you are the one who they know won’t open the door for other Blacks. I would urge you to either step aside, or get into the fight. 

We were purchased a long time ago, and then set free (supposedly). Why in 2015 are we placing ourselves on the auction block? The dollar is not worth your silence. Furthermore, understand that if you stay on a job for 20 years, in a leadership position, and you do nothing to bring equality, then you are part of the problem. You are setting us back 20 years.  What happens when new Black men and women come into that company, and you have built a standard that says we don’t fight for equality?  What will happen is they will be terminated for standing up for what is right.  Do us all a favor, and don’t let this happen. 

Lebron James does a lot of good in the community. He needs to add social awareness to his attributes. It is so necessary to know what is going on with your people. Don’t allow the NBA, Nike, your gated community, gobs of money, and all the other possessions you have keep you from your people. Knowing that a young, Black, unarmed, 12 year-old male was killed in your kingdom is important.  Having the ability to speak on it, and bring about change is paramount. By doing this, you will show the community the difference between Lebron James, and King James, because a great king cares for His PEOPLE.  

 

Actions Speak Louder Than Words…and your actions are clear.

tamir

What can be said when a 12-year-old boy is gunned down in a city park for having what appeared to be a “real” firearm?  The real question is what should be done after a 12-year-old boy who had a “toy” firearm is gunned down 2 seconds after law enforcement pulled to the scene, and the car had not even stopped yet? 

In the middle of the 911 call the caller says, “The gun is probably fake.” Then towards the end of what was reported as a 2 minute call, the caller says, “He’s probably a juvenile.” The only other missing factor that I did not see is that someone said that he was Black.  I truly believe that this changed the tone of the entire matter, and was the driving force behind the shoot first, and ask questions later mentality that was obviously possessed by these officers. 

Was Tamir Elijah Rice really a threat?  Or did he become a threat because he was a young Black man?  Were you threatened that he may go to college, and change the world?  Were you threatened that he may one day grow up, and become President? Were you threatened that he may one day become a civil rights leader, and join the fight against racism, and inequality? Maybe he would become an attorney who would fight against Corporate-America and the obviously unfair unemployment rate for Blacks, or a Doctor who cures Cancer. We will never know because his life was cut short at the mere age of 12. 

How is it that Michael Vick received 23 months for dogfighting, yet there is no indictment for the killers of this child?  Is a Black life worth less than that of a dog?  Based on what I see, the answer is yes.  Tamir Rice, Mike Brown, and Sandra Bland are all proofs of the injustice, and lack of concern for Black lives. 

It seems that the side of the police vehicle should read, “Protect some lives, and Serve death to others, especially those of color.”  Why should we trust law enforcement?  Who is “Officer Friendly?”  It is a sad thought to think that the same officer who was just reading me a book, is going to one day be the same officer trying to throw the book at me. 

There are criminals in this world.  No one can deny this, and I do not think that anyone is trying to. When you choose to categorize an entire race of people (including our youth), and deal with them harshly no matter the situation, then yes we have to say that Black Lives Matter.  

We don’t want another Tamir Rice, Mike Brown or Sandra Bland.  Because when this happens, it means that the innocent can die, and there is no consequence. Until you can guarantee that, then the words will continue to be BLACK LIVES MATTER!!

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What is the Black on Black Radio Show?

What is the Black on Black Radio Show?

Black on Black Live

In 2015, Indianapolis launched its newest and most informative

internet radio show, Black on Black with Gregory Meriweather. The show is featured on Radionext.tv, which was founded by Harold HB Bell, of Indianapolis, IN.

Defined as “Us helping us,” Black on Black addresses relevant issues

that are cancerous to the Black community. Some of those issues

include Black parenting, Black relationships, Black church, Black

education, Black health, Black community leaders, Black government,

employment opportunities, the penal system and criminal injustice.

Motivated by his passion and commitment to change the landscape of

the Indianapolis Black community, Gregory Meriweather founded the

Black on Black show and serves as its weekly host. Standing firm on the

concept of “We are responsible for us” and subscriber to the notion,

“We are the ones we’ve been waiting for,” first expressed by Barack

Obama, Meriweather believes the strength of the Black community is in

the muscle…

View original post 88 more words

What is the Black on Black Radio Show?

What is the Black on Black Radio Show?

In 2015, Indianapolis launched its newest and most informative

internet radio show, Black on Black with Gregory Meriweather. The show is featured on Radionext.tv, which was founded by Harold HB Bell, of Indianapolis, IN.

Defined as “Us helping us,” Black on Black addresses relevant issues

that are cancerous to the Black community. Some of those issues

include Black parenting, Black relationships, Black church, Black

education, Black health, Black community leaders, Black government,

employment opportunities, the penal system and criminal injustice.

Motivated by his passion and commitment to change the landscape of

the Indianapolis Black community, Gregory Meriweather founded the

Black on Black show and serves as its weekly host. Standing firm on the

concept of “We are responsible for us” and subscriber to the notion,

“We are the ones we’ve been waiting for,” first expressed by Barack

Obama, Meriweather believes the strength of the Black community is in

the muscle work of its people.

Black on Black is changing the community one program at a time. To

date, the show has been host to guests such as Indianapolis Chief of

Police, Rick Hite, Your Life Matters Executive Director, Michael

Twyman, Forest Manor Multi-Service Center Chief Executive Officer, Regina Marsh, Indiana State Senator, Greg Taylor, pastors, mothers, fathers, and corporate professionals.  12391982_471203899730595_211337209762954158_n

Commit yourself to supporting Black on Black with Gregory

Meriweather. Tune in (http://tunein.com/radio/Radio-Next-Cool-Groove-Radio-s212093/) each and every Tuesday from 2pm to 4 pm for

an engaging, enlightening, and empowering show.